INTRODUCTION TO THE LAWS, THE FUNDS AND HB724 – A WHITE PAPER GUIDE TO HB724 PART 1 BY MR. GEORGE FARIAS

PART 1 of A WHITE PAPER GUIDE TO HB724

INTRODUCTION hashtag #whitepaperhb724

UNCLAIMED MINERAL PROCEEDS COMMISSION IN ITS HISTORICAL MISSION 

March 21, 2014  PART 1   

BY MR. GEORGE FARIAS


TABLE OF CONTENTS

Click on the topic for the link, please note some supplements are scheduled for publication in the next few days

INTRODUCTION :  INTRODUCTION TO THE LAWS, THE FUNDS, DUTIES AND HB724 INFO

Supplement #1 DEPOSITS OF MINERALS FROM UNCLAIMED WELLS

Supplement #2 LEGAL ISSUES RELATED TO THE OWNERSHIP OF MINERALS IN TEXAS

Supplement #3 ASSISTANCE TO THE UNCLAIMED LAND GRANT MINERALS

Supplement #4 PROPOSED DRAFT OF LEGISLATIVE REPORT

Supplement #5 PROPOSED LEGISLATIVE COMMITTEE TO REPRESENT INTERESTS OF LAND GRANTEES

Supplement #6 PROPOSED DRAFT FOR UNCLAIMED MINERAL PROCEEDS COMMISSION

Supplement #7 WHICH FUNDS BELONG TO THE SPANISH LAND GRANT HEIRS?

 


TOPICS:

INTRODUCTION TO THE LAWS, THE FUNDS, DUTIES AND HB724 INFO


 

 

 

TVOC Inserted Note: Please note we are breaking this supplement up into parts for easier understanding.  

Please note: these are Mr. Farias' personal presentations to the HB724 commission as a descendant/heir and do not reflect the opinions of anyone else. They are a matter of public record. 

Please note on Page 1 about acceptable forms of proof for deceased descendants we highlighted in Red. Interestingly the State is not accepting proof heirship from the heirs. This is the point of why HB724 was created to help us get the funds, they are withholding. 

Also you will see some boxes of information like this box, we have decided to break this article up in subtopics for easy digest. They are not part of the original document, they are notes to identify subtopics in the white paper.

 

INTRO

 

The work and mission of the HB724 Unclaimed Mineral Proceeds Commission appear to be complex,

but in reality they are simple and attainable. Some general comments are provided first and then a

specific approach is outlined to comply with the mandates contained in House Bill 724 to study

unclaimed land grant mineral proceeds.

 

The descendants of Spanish and Mexican land grants in South Texas maintain that  Common Law, 

i.e. Texas Property Law, enacted in 1840, authorizes and gives them the right to file claims against 

mineral proceeds from unclaimed oil and gas wells whose owners have never been found, which 

are located in the respective land grants awarded their ancestors.

 

The most important conclusion for the commission to reach is a major legal one, confirming and 

validating that these descendants do have a claim to those minerals under present law as written, 

that is, that it is intrinsic in the law.  For the commission to reach this consensus may require an

independent interpretation of the law because the law  neither specifically authorizes this right, referring

to  “unknown heirs,” who now have become “known” by virtue of a declaratory judgment in state district

court, nor does it specifically deny it. In a simplistic viewpoint, if the law does not prohibit something then

it must be legal.  To be realistic, the validation of the law might require an official interpretation.

 

 UNCLAIMED PAYOUTS

It is interesting to note the following statement in the state comptroller’s website, Window on State 

Government,   “Unclaimed Property and Mineral Proceeds,” Item (6) states, “If the owner is 

deceased, you can provide the Unclaimed Property Division with documentation proving you 

are an heir of the reported owner. Such documentation includes copies of wills, or, if there 

is no will, a notarized  Affidavit of Heirship is required for claims of less than $10,000 or less.  

Claims that exceed $10,000 require a court’s Determination of Heirship or a Small Estates 

Affidavit of Heirship, both of which require a judge’s signature.” (see Attachment A). 

No doubt, the declaratory judgment meets this requirement. 

TVOC Inserted Note: See http://www.window.state.tx.us/up/98-893_UP_Mineral_Proceeds.pdf   
and http://www.window.state.tx.us/up/gen_claims.html

This statement by the state comptroller indicates that her office has accepted formal legal heirship 

documents to pay claims for unclaimed mineral proceeds. If so, a precedent has been established. 

A review of payments by the comptroller for claims using legal heirship documents should confirm 

the claims of descendants of Spanish and Mexican land grants.

 

Payment of such claims by the comptroller need not necessarily have been made to these 

descendants but might have been paid to other Texas citizens. For example, a person in the 

Permian Basin might have found out his great grandfather sold the land but not the minerals, 

left no will, and never formally passed title to his descendants.  With heirship court documents, 

the person could claim his or her rights. It also seems very possible that a review of case law 

would discover legal challenges ruled in favor of the heirs.

 

 CLAIMS OF RIGHTS - HELP OF COMMISSION

Since this is a state matter the Texas Attorney General is the person to provide an opinion, which normally

takes six months to promulgate. I recommend that one or two lawyers from the attorney general’s office be

assigned to the commission to obtain this opinion and as liaison personnel to assist in expediting the legal

opinion process. This assignment of staff is in keeping with Section 2(h) of HB724 that states,

“On the commission’s request, the comptroller, or any other state agency,

department, or office shall provide any assistance this commission needs to perform the commission’s

duties.” These lawyers can also help scrutinize the related points of law for an opinion.  The other legal points

to be clarified  include laws about transference of mineral rights when the contract is silent, current statutes of

limitations, if any, the transference of minerals to owners under the Texas Constitution of 1866, the fiduciary

responsibility of the state for unclaimed funds and its rights to interest on those funds (but not the principal),

etc.  It is not the job of the commission to do homework. That is the responsibility of staff. The idea of a

subcommittee to do limited study is a sound one, which I refer to as an executive committee if it includes

the chairman.

 

One of the other legal points bears clarification. It has been stated that prior to 1866 Texas landowners did

not own the mineral interests on the land, but many of the families of the original grantee were living on the

land. However, Appendix III of the New Guide to Spanish and Mexican Land Grants in South Texas, Texas

General land Office, 2009, “Sal del Rey” and Mineral Rights in Texas, pages 167-168, states,

“This prompted a substitute ordinance with a broad and contrary effect.

The substitute did not refer specifically to “Sal del Rey.’ Instead it proposed giving away the state’s

mineral interest to existing surface owners. The effect was retrospective.  Owners of land granted 

by the successive sovereigns   (Spain, Mexico, Republic of Texas, and the state of Texas) before 

adoption of this amendment, would be given complete ownership of the minerals on their land. “ 

(see Attachment B)

 

 MINERAL PROCEEDS

There seems to be confusion about what constitutes unclaimed mineral proceeds. I divide them into

two categories. The first I call Type One and are abandoned royalties of title holders who have 

disappeared. These proceeds come back to the oil and gas companies, and every three years they

come back to the state with an amount and name or best description. This is the fund maintained by the

Texas Comptroller’s Unclaimed Property Division mixed in with traveler’s checks, bank accounts, and

other property. The analysis of these funds indicate  that most of the persons named will never be able to

recover their property.

 

The other unclaimed mineral proceeds are those I categorize as Type Two, those produced from 

unclaimed wells whose owners have never been found without a name attached.  These funds

come to the state after three years such as the Type One proceeds to be kept in trust by the state.

If, as previously mentioned, the unclaimed wells have the initials of the original land grantee that

practice enforces descendants’ claims.

 

Oil and gas companies make extensive efforts to find rightful owners for obviously they need to

legally drill for all the benefits of current revenues and payment of royalties to lease holders. They

make exhaustive searches of county and other records. Failing there the oil and gas companies

desire to stake a claim by drilling an unclaimed well at great expense. It is an investment in the

future as they hope and pray that  rightful owners will someday come forth.

 

DRILLING PERMITS / PROCESSES / MONEY RECORDING KEEPING

Drilling an unclaimed well requires a permit from a district judge representing the state, called a

receivership hearing. In granting the request, the judge may require the oil and gas company to

reserve 100% of the funds and pass them on to the state after three years or the

 

judge may require that the funds be deposited in a county bank account called a registry. If the rightful

owners show up in the future, the  oil and gas company can recoup its investment. In one case I reviewed,

the petroleum company could keep 75% and grant the owners a 25% royalty. This ratio may not be uniform.

 

This process raises several questionsFirst, does all the money kept initially by the drilling company 

or held by the county find its way ultimately to the state? Second, does the state monitor these wells, 

their units and dollars of production, to insure all funds are paid in? Third, what controls does the 

state have to insure that all the monies find their way to state coffers? As a former auditor, a major

part of my study was to determine if a company had what are called good internal controls. The

Texas Railroad Commission has all the records and an analysis of their data should show the

number of unclaimed wells and their units and dollars of production. From this data the state could

set up an accounts receivable for each oil company. Fourth, are the oil and gas companies 

sending in reports as required to corroborate the Texas Railroad Commission figures? If the

state is accepting the money on faith, human nature will take the path of least resistance and retain the

funds.

 

Fifth, do state agencies have adequate staff to perform their duties, especially now with the 

increased production from the Eagle Ford Shale and forthcoming new mineral discoveries? 

Sixth, is the state enforcing the 1985 law and are the oil and gas companies meeting their 

agreements to abide by the law?

 

 HOW MUCH MONEY ARE WE TALKING ABOUT

The next important question to be raised here is to determine the amount of money that has 

been submitted to the state since 1985. The oil and gas companies and the state absolved themselves

of all liabilities before then. The law mandates that these proceeds be deposited into the General

Revenue Fund. What we do not know is what happens after that.

 

Does the comptroller’s unclaimed property division handle these funds or do they go directly 

to another department?  Is there  a large escrow account holding the fifty million dollars in trust 

pledged by Getty Oil and it’s forty-nine fellow plaintiffs to start a new fund, in addition to thirty-three 

years of production (since September 1, 1980 as per Compromise Settlement Agreement) or has 

the state appropriated and budgeted the funds for other state needs? If so, it questions the 

fiduciary responsibility of the state, which can be corrected currently by starting to deposit 

Type Two mineral proceeds in a trust account that is visible to all.   

 

WELLS WITH NO NAMES ATTACHED

The question then must arise as to why there are so many wells with no owner and no name attached.

The answer is simple. The land grantee and his or her family never sold or otherwise conveyed these

mineral interests. The possibility that someone will show up with title in hand registered in a county that

he or she is the owner of a certain unclaimed well is remote. In most cases, therefore, the descendant 

heirs maintain that the ownership is still in the estate of the land grantee, that the rights are still in 

the family, and the descendants are “de facto” owners.  Webster defines  de facto as ” in reality or

fact, serving a function without being legally or officially established, or in practice not necessarily

ordained by law.”

 

 EXAMPLE OF FIRST DECLARATORY JUDGEMENT

On July 8, 2008, my first declaratory judgment was approved by the late 229th District 

Judge Ricardo H. Garcia for the Jacinto de la Peña land grant in Zapata County.

During the proceedings Mrs. Eileen McKenzie Fowler, my attorney, asked Judge Garcia if, in his opinion, 

the heirs had a right to these unclaimed minerals. He said, “There is no doubt about it.” It is in

the record. This was one judge’s opinion but from a distinguished jurist with a long résumé. This was

encouraging to me and confirmed what we had been told by Mrs. Fowler. As she mentioned in her

prior report, this was also the opinion of Houston 157th Civil District Court Judge Felix Salazar and

her former law partner, described posthumously as a “trailblazer.” He had a major role in kicking off

our campaign. Mrs. Fowler and Judge Salazar consulted with other Houston lawyers for assistance

in designing a workable plan to bring justice long-delayed and long-denied to South Texas families.

 

 MISCONCEPTIONS

There are some misconceptions that need clarification about our cause: 

  1. That our claim will infringe on the rights of title holders. That is incorrect as they have full
  2. legal rights and contracts with oil and gas companies, many of them generating lucrative royalties.
  3. Our HEIRS brochure on the front page states this very emphatically so that there is no misunderstanding.
  4. As previously stated, we have no claim on land as the state laws of adverse possession are clear about this.
  5. That our descendants will become wealthy by filing claims. Except for a lucky few that will not be the case

The basic formula will be based upon the amount of production and the personal percentage interest each

claimant has to the whole base of descendants of that grant. If I am one of a hundred living descendants

(called primaries), my declaratory judgment would show that I can only get 1%. If there are thousands of

descendants on my grant, my percentage goes down. I can only claim my share and no more. However,

we are claiming thirty-three years of back production and for future production,

so the sums received may be slightly more than modest. These funds would be important,

nonetheless, as many descendants are on retirement incomes or are unemployed.

6. That the state escrow funds will be compromised or depleted.

That will never happen. Oil and gas revenues are increasing and the funds will be stimulated.

More importantly, the majority of claimants , here also, will never come forward. Even though

thousands have joined our cause, there are hundreds of thousands and perhaps millions who

will never come forward.  The monies are there in perpetuity, if and when any descendant comes

forward.  Our experience is that most descendants do not know their ancestry, they have other

personal priorities, and many are simply not interested.

7. That the oil and gas companies are obligated to the heirs certified in court as

     legitimate descendants by a declaratory judgment. 

Not so. The oil and gas companies, under the law, are obligated to the state for deposits of unclaimed funds.

Their direct obligations are to title holders who have leases. Any noted problems are between them.

The state, in turn, under property law, is obligated to the descendants for payment of unclaimed minerals.

Descendants look to the State of Texas for justice.

I believe with the help of the commission a win-win situation can be achieved.

Descendants should have no adversaries in claiming their rights. The work of the commission

will guide the state to make improvements. It was correctly stated previously that it is not the commission’s

responsibility to audit or correct noted deficiencies in the state system. That is the work of state

agencies and the legislature. However, in the process of its work and hearing testimony from different

parties, the commission can make recommendations that will have substantial weight. The commission’s

ultimate work will benefit the state, the oil and gas companies, always in need of good public relations, the

title holders, and ultimately descendants who have been disenfranchised. All citizen of Texas will benefit

from the commissions deliberations and conscientious conclusions.

SOME HISTORY OF HB724

The HEIRS Committee under Mrs. Eileen McKenzie Fowler tried to amend the law in 2013 similar to the

HB2611 bill in 2011 spearheaded by Mr. Al Cisneros that did not pass. Representative Ryan Guillen

would not sponsor it again because he said he did not have the votes, and it would not pass. At the time

we found out that he and his staff had filed HB724. The HEIRS Committee had no input in writing the bill.

Representative Guillen said that if he sponsored a bill recommending a commission to independently

review the matter, it had a better chance of passing. At that point Mrs. Fowler’s clients mobilized to

support the bill and wrote their state representatives and senators in support. Her group of client

descendants (twenty thousand of whom perhaps twelve thousand are registered voters) is the

largest, and their letters, calls, and emails were a deciding factor in its passage. I am certain other

descendants perceived its value and advocated as well.

 

Mr. Al Cisneros and his colleague and friend, former Senator Hector Uribe, also had a significant

impact with their work and expert testimony getting it out of the state house of representatives committee.

There was a concerted effort in the Senate to kill the bill but was saved by District 21 Senator Judith 

Zaffirini from Laredo.  It was her skill, perseverance and long service to Texas which outmaneuvered

those bent on its destruction.

 

Our group also had the help of the HEIRS committee of clients headed by Mrs. Fowler,

Mrs. Rita Lopez Tice, business owner from Laredo, Mr. Miguel Alonso “Al’ Martinez,

business owner from Corpus Christi, Ms. Cecilia Gallardo Vallejo from San Antonio now

a case manager for Mrs. Fowler in La Porte, and our lobbyist Mr. Jimmy Willborn, all

descendants. Mr. Willborn was very instrumental in our success in his visits to Austin. He is

a former police officer, past president of the San Antonio Police Officers Association, and a

former Bexar County constable. He and his wife have worked tirelessly over the years in

support of legislation to benefit peace officers in their critical and dangerous work. He also

has the added distinction of having been Director of the Texas Narcotics Control Program

under former Governor Ann Richards. We are indebted also to the other sponsors of the

bill, Texas House of Representative members, Abel Herrero District 34, J.M. Lozano 

District 43, Roberto D. Alonso District 104, Philip Cortez District 117 and in the Senate

20th District Senator Juan “ Chuy” Hinojosa.

 

The bill passed with one nay vote in the House of Representatives and three nay votes in the Senate.

Representative Guillen called this a “landmark” bill.  It is, in my estimation, the most significant law

regarding property law and oil and gas legislation since 1985. It was a minor miracle. It is an old truism

that if you want to pass a bill In Austin, you need money and power. We had virtually no money,

but we did have power in the thousands who wrote their representatives and senators. For certain

there is some conflict and discord among the descendants regarding the progress and the avenues

being followed, but all are united in seeking the same remedy.

 

HB724 seems to have passed, I believe, because the legislature saw this commission as

coming into being at a very critical time. The commission’s work has higher implications

due to the revenues that are at stake with burgeoning oil and gas explorations. No doubt the

legislature felt it would be a great opportunity for a responsible and diverse professional group

to help move Texas forward into the 21st century.

 

 TEXAS RAILROAD COMMISSION RECOMMENDATION

To review this matter and to have a  broader picture, I recommend  invited testimony from the

Texas Railroad Commission, The Texas Oil and Gas Association, a district judge who issues

unclaimed well permits, or, in the alternative, a lawyer who works full-time finding rightful

owners. Carroll Lake and Associates in Kenedy, Texas, employ fifty lawyers for this purpose,

mostly doing work for Marathon Oil Company. Perhaps one of their lawyers could testify.

 

 COMPLIANCE

 

To get to the heart of the matter I am listing the individual mandates of HB 724 and the 

resource necessary to comply:


Section 3(1) the amount of unclaimed original land grant proceeds delivered to the comptroller 

that remain unclaimed on December 1, 2014.

Source: The state comptroller’s office can verify the Type One unclaimed mineral proceeds

from their data base by breaking down how much are unclaimed mineral proceeds from  title

holders separate from  bank accounts, travelers checks and other property. This is for information

and has no significant bearing for most descendants.    Type Two Unclaimed mineral proceeds

will be more difficult to determine since the law apparently only requires the state comptroller to

keep records for ten years. An analysis by the comptroller can be done on unclaimed mineral

proceeds that have been  received from oil and gas sources from all property in Texas for the

period. Perhaps,  they will be able to break down how much came from the land grants. However,

while not comprehensive it  will provide an idea of what has been received and what should have

been deposited in an escrow account.


 

Section 3(2) recommendations for efficient and effective procedures under which the 

state may be required to (A)  determine the owners of the proceeds; (B) notify the 

owners of the proceeds; and (C) distribute  the proceeds to the owners.

 

Source: Title holder owners of the proceeds cannot be found as oil and gas companies

have been unable to do so. What the commission can do is validate that the

descendants of the   original grantee have a vested right and are “ de facto” owners.

Notification can be done through their respective lawyers, but it will not be possible

to notify all eligible. The  proceeds can be distributed in the same fashion.


 

Section 3(3) proposed legislation necessary to implement the recommendation 

made in the final report.

 

Source: Mrs. Fowler in her report on February 28, 2014, included for the public record

proposed amendments to the Texas Property Law, if needed, to make the law more

inclusive but should not be necessary to validate claims.


 

Section 3(4) any administrative recommendations proposed by the commission.

 

Source: The testimony and facts gathered during its proceedings will result in natural recommendations to the state.


 

Section 3(5) a complete explanation of each of the commission’s recommendations

Source: A task of the writing of the report.


 

It is worthy to note in closing that payment of claims will, to some degree, stimulate the Texas

economy. The monies will come back to  the government in federal Income taxes and state sales,

gasoline, and other taxes. The money will find its way back to Austin in the end.

 

       Mr. Lance K. Bruun, commission chairman, stated correctly at the first meeting on January 31, 2014,

that it is not the responsibility of the commission to hear past grievances. However his patience and that

of the commission in allowing public testimony about past injuries to South Texas families was commendable

because it revealed that our cause is not a perfunctory one but deeply rooted in tragic events experienced

for over a century. Recognizing the past, the descendants look forward to the future and the great

opportunity this forum represents for relief.

 

In  conclusion, the descendants seek accountability and justice by the equitable distribution of oil

and gas revenues.  It is hoped that these facts, opinions, and ideas will guide the commission in

its very momentous  task.  I would be pleased to  lend support as needed and  appreciate the

willingness of the commissioners to serve and to undertake this historical mission.

 

________________________                                  _________________________

Signed                                                                    Date

 

Biographical Note: George Farias  is  a retired executive director of a community mental health center in Bexar County. His hobby is ancestral study and U.S. Borderlands history and is an online retailer of books in these subject categories. He is a writer of family history books and genealogical and historical essays. His ancestors had twelve grants in South Texas containing  97,918 acres. Six of these grants have good gas and oil production, and he has been certified for three of those as a legitimate heir by declaratory judgment. He joined Mrs. Eileen McKenzie Fowler’s program in 2006 and is member of her HEIRS committee. He is also vice president of The Land Grant Justice Association, Inc.

 

Author George Farías blogged and used by permission  see our terms to request permission to publish
Please note: these are Mr. Farias' personal presentations to the HB724 commission as a descendant/heir and do not reflect the opinions of anyone else. They are a matter of public record. 
Photo Credit: Source: the Voice of Change Network Copyright 2014 All Rights Reserved

Please read part 2 of this white paper  or see the tag #whitepaperhb724